Archive for the 'Bicycling' Category

Curb white-collar driving on roads

(Because this is too good not to be parodied. I have left his grammatical errors untouched.)

THE explosion in the number of adults taking up driving on public roads, who are also usually well-educated, has swayed public opinion.

Drivers have managed to paint other road users, particularly cyclists, as irresponsible, especially in according drivers the right to endanger cyclists’ lives.

Yet every day, scores of drivers occupy all the lanes along Upper Thomson Road and other roads.

It takes only a single driver with his “reasonable” appeal to be allowed to emit noise and air pollution to disrupt optimum usage of a public stretch for other users.

It does not make sense to encourage driving on public roads.

I can sympathise with the poor blue-collar worker commuting daily from Johor Bahru but not the white-collar worker who lives an easy train ride away from her workplace. To those who still insist on driving, kindly stick to your video games at home.

It is safer and in the best interest of the public.

The original:

Curb recreational cycling on roads

THE explosion in the number of adults taking up recreational cycling on public roads, who are also usually well-educated, has swayed public opinion.

Recreational cyclists have managed to paint other road users, particularly motorists, as irresponsible, especially in according cyclists the right to use public roads.

Yet almost every morning, scores of cyclists occupy a full lane along Upper Thomson Road and other roads.

It takes only a single cyclist with his “reasonable” appeal for a 1.5m safe distance from a motorist to disrupt optimum usage of a public stretch for other users.

It does not make sense to encourage recreational cycling on public roads.

I can sympathise with the poor blue-collar worker cycling to work but not a recreational cyclist. To those who still insist on cycling, kindly use your stationary bike in your home or gym.

It is safer and in the best interest of the public.

Dr Terence Teoh

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In Paris, bus lanes = bike lanes

Bus lanes in Paris are physically separated from car lanes, so that motorists are less tempted to cut into the bus lane, but if the street has only one car lane, the dividers are low enough so that emergency vehicles can cut across lanes to get ahead. Furthermore, the bus lanes are wide enough to let two-wheeled vehicles pass stopped buses. Two-wheeled vehicles are allowed in the bus lanes even though some roads have parallel bike lanes.

Human Transit has pictures and more.

As a comparison, some Singaporean drivers seem to think that 1) cyclists shouldn’t be in bus lanes, and 2) if a cyclist is in a bus lane during the bus lane hours, it’s OK for cars to violate traffic law, cut into the bus lane and pass the cyclist at a dangerous distance.

Intersection density and walkability

In my feedback for URA’s Concept Plan 2011, I followed up on the suggestions of the focus group to improve walkability. From comparing my own experiences walking in Singapore versus elsewhere, I found that I enjoyed walking much more in cities with frequent intersections. It means you don’t have to walk a long way to the next intersection if you want to cross a road, and it also slows down traffic, thus increasing the pleasantness of the environment for walkers. Apparently there’s now a study supporting my intuition.

In terms of friendliness to cyclists, too high an intersection density might prove annoying unless there is a “green wave”. But too low a density, as is the case in Singapore, means that the few intersections there are tend to be large and high traffic. These tend to be more dangerous for cyclists. The parts of my Singapore commute I dreaded most were the tricky intersections. After many hours of staring at maps I was still unable to purge them from my commute, and any commute from the northeast to the west of Singapore remains woefully unconnected by any park connectors.

Jeanette Wang

blogs about the logistics of bicycle commuting.

I’m not a fan of backpacks for bike commuting in Singapore’s weather. Racks are far more suitable. Last thing you need is something restricting air flow to your back.

Mass Cycling Event

A commenter brought to my attention a mass cycling event on 29 Nov in Singapore, held in conjunction with the Climate Conference in Copenhagen. It will start from the Xtreme SkatePark in East Coast Park, head to Fort Road, and return. Both skaters and cyclists welcome. For more details, see their website.

Survey on bike lanes in Singapore

A friend is doing a Masters thesis on the potential costs/benefits of having bike lanes in Singapore. Part of her project involves analysing responses to a survey on attitudes of people towards potential bike lanes in Singapore. If you live or have lived in Singapore, please spare a few minutes to do the survey. Non-cyclists welcome too!

Ride of Silence, Singapore, 2009

Ride of Silence Poster

The organisers are still looking for people with First Aid certification and photographers. Contact them at to help.

If anyone would like to help with printing and distributing the pamphlets, do contact me or the organisers.

Hope to see you there.